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World Association of International Studies

PAX, LUX ET VERITAS SINCE 1965
Post David Pike's Lecture, "The Constitution vs The King: British Support for the American Resistance"
Created by John Eipper on 06/28/20 4:00 AM

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David Pike's Lecture, "The Constitution vs The King: British Support for the American Resistance" (Enrique Torner, USA, 06/28/20 4:00 am)

In a further search into my e-mail archives, I came across a videotaped lecture that Prof. Pike delivered at his institution, The American University of Paris:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHF11I6EGUg

JE comments:  AUP President Celeste Schenck introduces David in this 2015 lecture, with a warm and colorful overview of our dear friend's life.  David's topic, British support for the rebellious American colonies, shows the breadth of his scholarly research.  Although David's work was primarily focused on the Spanish Civil War and WWII, this was only the tip of the proverbial iceberg.


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  • Spellbound by a David Pike Lecture: Gary Moore Reports (John Eipper, USA 06/29/20 5:49 AM)

    Gary Moore writes:



    Well, I've now spent much of my Sunday sitting spellbound before the computer and listening, in awe, to the eloquence, erudition and insight of the irreplaceable David Pike, in that magnificent video clip considerately provided by Enrique Torner.


    So here is a glimpse of something in the heart of WAIS, which lives on.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHF11I6EGUg


    JE comments:  Gary, I couldn't agree more.  To erudition, eloquence et al. we could add gravitas to the list of David Pike descriptors.  One point I forgot to mention from American University of Paris President Celeste Schenck's introduction:  David's rookie season at AUP was that milestone year of Paris rebellion, 1968.  How I wish David could give us more details on those times.  (He probably did; I need to comb through the WAIS archives to refresh my memory.)

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    • Has Academia Lost the "Lecture Culture"? (Enrique Torner, USA 06/29/20 2:21 PM)
      I am so glad Gary Moore appreciated the David Pike lecture I posted on June 28th. David gave the same lecture at our university (Minnesota State), but it was accidentally not recorded, so I was elated when I found it recorded by AUP.

      This was the third time he delivered the same lecture, because he had told me the one he delivered at Minnesota State he had delivered already somewhere else and was very well received, and he was at MSU in the spring of 2014. I was raised in a "lecture culture": Spain. In Spain, not only college professors offer lectures in class (at least they did when I lived there; now I'm told there is less of an emphasis on lectures), but lectures form part of the culture: while I lived in Spain I attended many lectures by literary authors, historians, artists, and others sponsored by several cultural institutions. Some people like going to the movies or to the theater. Not that I don't like doing that, but I always loved a good lecture, and David was a master lecturer, and I wanted WAIS to possess and hold those I could find so they could be easily accessed in a forum he belonged to and cherished for so many years. Somebody mentioned that David could have been an actor: I agree.


      As I said in earlier posts, I am subscribed to The Great Courses Plus, and have been watching or listening to many of their courses. This company meticulously selects its lecturers. They start with the top 1% of college professors, and then they do further selection by listening to them and interviewing them and their students and colleagues. They research them thoroughly. Probably they missed David because he was in Paris, and their lecturers are English speakers, so they are located either in the US or in Great Britain. David was nonetheless among the best lecturers I have seen in my life, and I have watched/listened to many, while driving in the car, washing dishes, walking, cleaning, you name it.


      Unfortunately, I have come to realize that there is no such culture in this country and that US college undergraduate students need to be incentivized to attend lectures by guest speakers, even by famous authors or historians. The photo I shared recently of David Pike and myself included graduate students, all but one from Spanish American countries, who, not only appreciated his lectures, but desired to have their picture taken with them as well, as a memento of the event they cherished. I'm glad they did and shared the photo with me. I wish I had taken more of them! Being the host and coordinator of guest speakers involves a lot of work and details and I end up forgetting taking pictures of them. Instead, I order the videotaping and have pictures taken by others. Either way, even when I am not hosting, I still tend to forget to take pictures because I get so involved just enjoying the little time I have with them.


      Anyway, I am glad Gary enjoyed David's lecture, and I hope other WAISers watch, not only that one, but the other ones I have shared with WAIS, as well as the articles I shared before. My idea is to put together as much of his work as possible in WAIS: it would make a great tribute to him. Over the years, he shared several articles with me, and we exchanged many emails, and I have been digging through my many files searching for any materials I could share with WAIS. Maybe other WAISers can contribute in this task as well.


      JE comments:  Enrique, you honor David and all of WAISdom!  And you bring up a reality I've long known but never articulated:  the "lecture culture" is dead in the US.  I've read widely and taken dozens of workshops on teaching effectiveness, and not once has the topic been "how to deliver a dazzling lecture."  The emphasis is now on collaborative learning, project-based work, "flipped" classrooms, using technology of every type, accommodating different "learning styles," and the all-important maxim:  recognizing that no youthful attention span lasts more than ten or fifteen minutes.

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